Anticipation in Africa – a Need or an Illusion?

Anticipation in Africa – a Need or an Illusion? 2016-10-21T15:05:25+00:00

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Science Talk
Presenter:
Prof D Cristina Stefan, African Paediatric Adolescent Oncology, South Africa
Presenter: Prof Mihai Nadin, University of Texas, United States of America
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How does the possible future affect the present? This is the most important issue humankind faces. Anticipation is action informed by awareness of future possibilities.

Africa could—and should—adopt the perspective of anticipation accepting that it has a different meaning than for the rest of the world. The West sees the human being as a machine, and conditions the individual to behave like one. Africa is its human potential. Its future depends upon their creativity.

Our presentation will focus on medicine informed by an anticipatory perspective. Given the many consequences of addressing human health in a pro-active manner, medical education will have to change from its exclusive focus on the mechanistic view of looking at human beings as machines (in need of maintenance and eventually spare parts) to an understanding of anticipation as an expression of life. Africa should give priority to the anticipatory activity of prevention. Those dedicated to a new understanding of science, education as well as those involved in political decision making, in the economy of medical care, in societal and cultural aspects, will find concrete examples of options available for Africa today.
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stefanProf D Cristina Stefan
African Paediatric Adolescent Oncology, South Africa
Presenter

From a clinical and educational platform with a number of masters degrees in paediatrics, oncology and epidemiology, supported by a PhD in education, my professional activity added gradually a managerial and leadership function in the global health field. Strongly involved in international networking and ensuring a number of effective and efficient global collaborations, across Africa, but also from Europe, Asia, America, in the fields of cancer research, scientific writing and policy development more recently I discovered anticipatory medicine which became the focus of sustained research. Voted the most influential woman in business (medicine) for Southern Africa by CEO Global(2016) and as the first woman president elect of the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer I continue to try to find answers to questions about the future of science and medicine and the impact on Africa. Founder of African Pediatric Adolescent Oncology and African Cancer Institute amongst others I remain passionate about innovative and creative initiatives translated in finding solutions to present problems and anticipating future challenges.
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nadinProf Mihai Nadin
University of Texas, United States of America
Presenter

The author of more than 20 books and over 200 articles, Nadin has lectured and written extensively on the mind, anticipation and dynamic systems, visualization, ubiquitous computing and various aspects of human-computer and human-technology interaction. He is credited with introducing various terms and phrases that have found wide usage throughout society, including “semiotic machine,” “the civilization of illiteracy” and “anticipatory computing.” Nadin was a pioneer of computational design in 1994 at the University of Wuppertal (Germany). Its purpose was to develop a computational theory of design. Computational design is the theory and practice of design for the age of ubiquitous computing. Nadin’s most recent research is focused on anticipation, a research domain he initiated almost 40 years ago. After research at Stanford University and UC Berkeley, he developed possibility models for market processes, auction models and real-time radio-astronomy data processing. Nadin founded the antÉ – Institute for Research in Anticipatory Systems. Nadin has a PhD in aesthetics from the University of Bucharest and a post-doctoral degree in philosophy, logic and theory of science from Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. He earned a master’s degree and a PhD in electronics and computer science and a master’s degree in philosophy.
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