Decolonising the Academy: Any Implications for Science & Research?

Decolonising the Academy: Any Implications for Science & Research? 2016-10-21T11:54:41+00:00

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Science Talk
Presenter:
Mr Robert Kriger, Heita Research Consultancy, South Africa
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Current calls by students, academics and other stakeholders for the ‘decolonisation of the academy’ are commonly viewed as pertinent largely to the humanities and the social sciences. Disciplines such as history, anthropology, cultural studies, languages and literature are frequently mentioned, and rightly so. But what of economics, the life sciences, public health or clinical medicine? Might one possibly also consider the “darling” as SA science, astronomy, as a candidate of ‘decolonisation’?

Apart from contextualising and providing a range of questions with regard to the above, what are the possible R&D policy implications – vide a new S&T WP – for the State, for higher education institutions, national and international research support agencies and, foremost, for our academic and professional workforce in their collective interactions with obviously disgruntled students? Has ‘transformation’ adopted new, enhanced and more deliberate meanings?

Interspersed with video-clips and slides, a few theses will be presented to facilitate a dialogue on this pressing issue which will have major implications for our universities – and our society.
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krigerMr Robert Kriger
Heita Research Consultancy, South Africa
Presenter

A former executive director – International Relations & Cooperation – at the NRF with the key objectives of ‘re-inserting’ South African research into the global arena and thereby contributing to the transformation and capacity-building efforts post 1994, my professional career has spanned three continents – Africa, Europe and North America. My primary focus has been, broadly speaking, the post-colonial endeavour of social justice based on principles of human rights, sustainability and equality. Although trained in the fields of theology, literary studies and pedagogy, my interests and activities have traversed that of development studies, ‘third world’ economics, history of imperialism and its relations to science policies.
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