Defining the Principles and Guidelines of Science Advice

Defining the Principles and Guidelines of Science Advice 2016-10-20T17:10:59+00:00

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Chair: Dr Heide Hackmann, International Council for Science, South Africa / Germany
Panellist: Dr Oladoyin Odubanjo, Nigerian Academy of Science, Nigeria
Panellist: Dr Tolu Oni, University of Cape Town, South African Young Academy of Science, South Africa
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At the World Science Forum (WSF) in Budapest in 2015, delegates called for:

“… The need to define the principles, processes and application of science advice and to address the theoretical and practical questions regarding the independence, transparency, visibility and accountability of those who receive and provide advice has never been more important … We call for concerted action of scientists and policy-makers to define and promulgate universal principles for developing and communicating science to inform and evaluate policy based on responsibility, integrity, independence, and accountability.”

The International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA) is making progress responding to this call. As an international and broad-based network, supported by recognized international science bodies such as ICSU and UNESCO, INGSA is well positioned to provide the platform to convene expertise and broadly consult on draft principles for science advice.

INGSA have a series of consultative workshops planned over the next year for input into the draft principles and guidelines, with the intention of reporting back to the World Science Forum in Jordan 2017. This session is Africa’s opportunity to have a say and we welcome your participation.
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hackmannDr Heide Hackmann
International Council for Science (ICSU), South Africa / Germany
Chair

Heide joined ICSU as Executive Director in March 2015, following eight years as Executive Director of the International Social Science Council. Heide read for a M.Phil. in contemporary social theory at the University of Cambridge, UK, and holds a Ph.D. in science and technology studies from the University of Twente in the Netherlands. She has worked as a science policy maker, researcher and consultant in the Netherlands, Germany, the United Kingdom and South Africa. Before moving into the world of the international councils, Heide worked as Head of the Department of International Relations and Quality Assessment of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Her career in science policy dates back to the early 1990s when she worked at the Human Sciences Research Council in South Africa. INGSA operates under the general aegis of ICSU.
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odubanjoDr Oladoyin Odubanjo
Nigerian Academy of Science, Nigeria
Panellist

Oladoyin Odubanjo is the executive secretary of the Nigerian Academy of Science. He is also the chairman of the Association of Public Health Physicians of Nigeria (Lagos Chapter) and was recently appointed member of the steering committee for Africa of the International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA). Before working for the Nigerian Academy of Sciences, Dr Odubanjo worked as a physician for the Nigerian government, including heading a government hospital with additional supervision of two primary health care facilities. Dr Odubanjo was instrumental to a successful transition of the Nigerian Academy of Science from a largely honorific organization to one that provides evidence-informed advice to government and other stakeholders. In the last eight years, he has collaborated with various African academies and the Network of African Science Academies (NASAC) on diverse projects aimed at informing policy.
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oniDr Tolu Oni
University of Cape Town, South African Young Academy of Science, South Africa
Panellist

Tolu Oni is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa. As a Public Health Medical Specialist and Urban Epidemiologist, she is a passionate advocate of health equity. Her research focuses on understanding the interaction between commonly co-occurring chronic conditions, upstream health determinants, the unplanned urban environment, and the impact on health outcomes. She has received several awards, including being selected as a Next Einstein Forum Fellow and a World Economic Forum Young Scientist. As a member and co-chair of the South African Young Academy of Science, and member of the Global Young Academy, she works actively to encourage public engagement to translate research findings into policy and practice. She was recently appointed member of the steering committee for the African hub of the International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA).
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