Securing Food with All Hands of the Stakeholders in The Pie: #AgriStakePie

Securing Food with All Hands of the Stakeholders in The Pie: #AgriStakePie 2016-10-27T13:27:32+00:00

[av_one_full first]

[av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=”]
Chair: Dr Lerato Matsaunyane, Agricultural Research Council, South Africa
Panellist: Mr Motlapele Morule, Arable Parable Pty Ltd, South Africa
Panellist: Ms Lesego Serolong, Bokamoso Impact Investments, South Africa
Panellist: Dr Palesa Sekhejane, Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa
Panellist: Mr Sandile Mahlangu, Agricultural Research Council, South Africa
Panellist: Dr Jasper Rees, Agricultural Research Council, South Africa
[/av_textblock]

[av_heading tag=’h3′ padding=’10’ heading=’Session summary’ color=” style=” custom_font=” size=” subheading_active=” subheading_size=’15’ custom_class=”][/av_heading]

[av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=”]
Food security is a puzzle of a country’s ability to produce enough quality food to feed its population. This puzzle comprises safety, availability, accessibility, and utilization. South Africa is a fat hungry nation because the puzzle is viewed biasedly in a one-directional address, thus lop-siding mitigation strategies aimed at averting a country from being food insecure or sustaining their food security status. The National Development Plan (NDP) is a priority aimed at “No more than 5% of the population should experience hunger, no more than 10% of the population should experience inadequate access to food, and no more than 13% per cent should live in poverty by 2030”.

A multi-directional cycle involving agricultural researchers, innovative farmers, consumer representation, economic projectors and production trainers will add the required ingredients to produce a pie that will feed South Africa. Policy makers and researchers must be directed by the farmers directed by the climatic conditions directed by consumer needs directed by nutritional need directed by economic ability. Join the conversation and let’s probe how we straighten the lop-siding construction of the pie by interrogating health and social scientist, agricultural scientist, young innovative farmers, economists and proactive food production specialist. Behind the fence, participation is will only strain your neck so getting closer to the pie and making sure your fingerprint is evident on the pie is crucial.
[/av_textblock]

[av_heading tag=’h3′ padding=’10’ heading=’Biographies’ color=” style=” custom_font=” size=” subheading_active=” subheading_size=’15’ custom_class=”][/av_heading]

[av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=”]
matsaunyaneDr Lerato Matsaunyane
Agricultural Research Council, South Africa
Chair

Lerato Matsaunyane, a Gauteng Department of Rural Development (GDARD) and National Research Foundation (NRF)-grant holder, is a researcher/ molecular biologist at the Agricultural Research Council focussing on crop protection. She has presented her research findings from her postgraduate degrees in both national and international conferences, and has won various awards from her research work. To balance the academic and practical aspect of research, she is mentoring and training postgraduate students within her research field. Her research interest is guided by the need to ensure that South Africa’s socio-economic status is elevated through food security.
[/av_textblock]

[av_hr class=’default’ height=’50’ shadow=’no-shadow’ position=’center’ custom_border=’av-border-thin’ custom_width=’50px’ custom_border_color=” custom_margin_top=’30px’ custom_margin_bottom=’30px’ icon_select=’yes’ custom_icon_color=” icon=’ue808′]

[av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=”]
moruleMr Motlapele Morule
Arable Parable Pty Ltd, South Africa
Panellist

Motlapele Morule started farming vegetables in 2004 on a family farm in Mahikeng, North West province, under the mentorship of his father. However, marketing the produce profitably proved to be an obstacle not only affected him but all the small scale producers in his area. He soon realized that production, marketing and retailing of the produce had to be different components of the same entity to be sustainable. As years past and he gained experience selling to supermarkets (Choppies, Spar, Pick n Pay, Fruit n veg market), hawkers, and village tuck-shops, he developed a model that would suit developing producers as a collective to access professional markets and create sustainable farming businesses. Arable Parable Pty Ltd has become the vehicle that drives this vision of creating opportunity for enterprises in an environment dominated by big commercial farming businesses. At present Arable Parable Pty Ltd is responsible for supply of fresh produce to Pick n Pay Showgate and Spar supermarket at Preller Plein, both in Bloemfontein and we are quickly gaining more markets in the region while considering expansion to a bigger market. Arable Parable Pty Ltd has developed a packaging brand, BAKWILD, and is continuing to develop more packages for all varieties of vegetables and fruits.
[/av_textblock]

[av_hr class=’default’ height=’50’ shadow=’no-shadow’ position=’center’ custom_border=’av-border-thin’ custom_width=’50px’ custom_border_color=” custom_margin_top=’30px’ custom_margin_bottom=’30px’ icon_select=’yes’ custom_icon_color=” icon=’ue808′]

[av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=”]
serolongMs Lesego Serolong
Bokamoso Impact Investments, South Africa
Panellist

Lesego Serolong is an entrepreneur catalysing social impact through the power of industry. Pairing innovative business practices with a passion for empowering communities, she is in the business of envisioning a self-sustaining rural South Africa. Lesego is the co-founder and chairwoman of Raise the Children International, a registered nonprofit here in South Africa, the USA and the UK. Raise the Children identifies self-motivated orphans from impoverished and rural communities and mobilizes resources for these children to gain access to higher education that leads to employment and servant leadership. Lesego’s heart for sustainable poverty alleviation in rural areas doesn’t end there. She realized that our orphan scholars come from communities with high rates of teenage pregnancy and unemployment, and when they joined the program, we set the expectation that they become nationwide servant leaders who transform their own communities. Subsequently, we strived to create opportunities that would reduce unemployment, migration to cities, and improve local economy through sustainable agri-businesses. Most importantly, we wanted to get young people interested in agriculture and see it as a business as well as create accessibility to fresh produce in areas devoid of healthy options and plagued by a health crisis. She then founded Bokamoso Impact Investments, a social enterprise solely dedicated to uplifting remote, underdeveloped areas of the country. Bokamoso introduces innovative agricultural solutions to poverty, incubates local rural entrepreneurs, and tackles lack of basic resources with commercial strategies and natural asset mobilization. The enterprise’s first project, an Agricultural Innovation Lab in Manyeledi Village, North West Province, incubates 20 motivated community members for four months, providing a crash course in agriculture that starts with seedlings, advances to planting, and ends with harvest. Alongside theoretical and practical lessons, the curriculum includes basic business practices.
[/av_textblock]

[av_hr class=’default’ height=’50’ shadow=’no-shadow’ position=’center’ custom_border=’av-border-thin’ custom_width=’50px’ custom_border_color=” custom_margin_top=’30px’ custom_margin_bottom=’30px’ icon_select=’yes’ custom_icon_color=” icon=’ue808′]

[av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=”]
sekhejaneDr Palesa Sekhejane
Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa
Panellist

Dr Sekhejane is a research specialist at the Human Sciences research Council (HSRC) in the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA). During her studies she published profusely the work emanating from her research experiments, resulting to over 7 journal articles and 1 book chapter. Current research interests are in health governance, biosciences, innovation and technology in the medical health science fraternity. She formed part of the first Gender Summit Africa in 2015 scientific committee and organising committee, under the leadership of the former CEO of HSRC, Prof. Olive Shisana. Member of ECOSOCC advisory arm of AU on Women and Gender Cluster. She is a research associate at the University of Johannesburg in the Faculty of Sciences. She is also a member of Organisation for Women in Sciences Development (OWSD), which champions and addresses the obstacles faced by women in developing countries. This landed her into participating at the launch of prestigious Next Einstein Forum (NEF). Most recently, she became the co-chairperson of the maiden international conference on Food Security and Safety (FSaS), under co-leadership of University of Johannesburg. Under her role, she championed equity in participation of young scientists, especially young women scientists. Her passion lies in seeing people (particularly youth) develop and prospering in their careers and personal lives.
[/av_textblock]

[av_hr class=’default’ height=’50’ shadow=’no-shadow’ position=’center’ custom_border=’av-border-thin’ custom_width=’50px’ custom_border_color=” custom_margin_top=’30px’ custom_margin_bottom=’30px’ icon_select=’yes’ custom_icon_color=” icon=’ue808′]

[av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=”]
mahlanguMr Sandile Mahlangu
Agricultural Research Council, South Africa
Panellist

Sandile Mahlangu is a dynamic, multidiscplined leader and social entrepreneur. He holds a MSc in Agricultural Economics focusing on rural development, and has more than 5 years’ experience working as a business developer, capacity builder and community developer. He works for the Agricultural Research Council as an Agricultural Economist focussed on research and farmers’ capacity development. Prior to joining ARC, he was involved with Adamopix where he dealt with SMME development and Land redistribution farms. His interests are in Rural Development, through sustainable farming, SMMEs development, proper cooperative systems and exploiting alternative markets and farming practices.
[/av_textblock]

[av_hr class=’default’ height=’50’ shadow=’no-shadow’ position=’center’ custom_border=’av-border-thin’ custom_width=’50px’ custom_border_color=” custom_margin_top=’30px’ custom_margin_bottom=’30px’ icon_select=’yes’ custom_icon_color=” icon=’ue808′]

[av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=”]
reesDr Jasper Rees
Agricultural Research Council, South Africa
Panellist

Dr Rees was a Professor of Biochemistry (Universty of Western Cape) where he played an important role in building one of the largest Biotechnology Departments in South Africa, and established major programs in apoptosis and drug discovery research, and plant biotechnology at UWC. He was also the program leader for a Royal Society/National Research Foundation linkage program with Durham, Oxford and Cambridge and UWC. His work in biomedical research led to the establishment of the DST/MinTek Nanotechnology Innovation Centre: Biolabels Unit. In parallel with this he also led the Fruit Tree Genetics Group, where there was exploration of a range of developmental and pathogenic conditions in apples. During the period 2008-2010 he established the first Next Generation Sequencing facility in Africa and moved to ARC in 2010, where he headed the Biotechnology Platform. He was responsible for the establishment of advanced facilities for genomics and bioinformatics, and their application. He was then appointed as the Group Executive for Research and Innovation Systems at the ARC, where he is responsible for a set of cross-cutting research areas including biotechnology, engineering, natural resource management and informatics. His research program involves plant genomics and molecular pathology on wheat, sorghum, maize, apples, sweetpotato and cassava.
[/av_textblock]

[/av_one_full]