Why a Bottom-Up Blueprint for Evidence, Ethics and Principles is Revolutionary

Why a Bottom-Up Blueprint for Evidence, Ethics and Principles is Revolutionary 2016-11-28T19:05:11+00:00

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Moderator: Mr Aidan Gilligan, Sci-Com, Ireland
Panellist: Prof Julian Kinderlerer, Cape Town University, South Africa
Panellist: Dame Anne Glover, University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Panellist: Prof Tateo Arimoto, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan
Panellist: Mr Imraan Patel, Department of Science and Technology, South Africa
Panellist: Dr Lidia Brito, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Mozambique
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This session announces to the world the findings of over 350 individuals who came together annually over five-years in Brussels, independently of the EU, to codify a unique set of ethics and principles to inform work at the boundary of science, society and public policy. What makes this body of work unique is that it stands alone, anchored by the real-life experiences of ‘bottom-up’ stakeholders from science and society, not ‘top-down’ elites. They challenged themselves to identify how power operates in science. They set themselves the task of establishing a new playbook to better address the practice, ethics and liability issues surrounding ‘evidence-based policy-making versus policy-biased evidence-making’. This process is now entering its final stage with SFSA delegates being the first to receive its conclusions. This Brussels Declaration stands to have considerable impact on the ways in which the practice of scientific research, the inputting of evidence to inform policy, and the ‘taking’ of advice by elected officials is structured and delivered to promote greater inclusivity, integrity and accountability. Five key architects from UNESCO, Japan, South Africa and the EU will deliver this final report, while debating with SFSA delegates the logic of its twenty key recommendations around five pivotal questions.
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gilliganMr Aidan Gilligan
SciCom, Ireland
Panellist

Aidan Gilligan (Irish) is Founder and CEO of SciCom, a Brussels-based science diplomacy agency with Associates in Copenhagen, Geneva, London and Paris, striving to make greater sense of science-policy-making for public, private and cause-related groups. Its ethos is to engage with decision-makers at the highest levels of the global scientific enterprise to champion ‘evidence-based policy above policy-biased evidence’SciCom draws on nearly twenty years of top-tier experience working at the nexus of science and society, particularly on emotionally charged issues. Harm reduction in relation to drugs, alcohol and tobacco use has been a particular focus for which the SciCom Network has received much acclaim. SciCom has equally been the main driver behind a four-hundred group initiative to create the first all-stakeholder blueprint of Ethics & Principles of Science Policy-Making. An EU affairs and legal expert, Aidan spent four years as Director of Communications at the College of Europe and ten years at the heart of the European Union’s in-house science services. He was also seconded to the Office of the Irish Chief Science Adviser. Aidan retains close working partnerships with senior international science officials; representatives of national governments, academies and agencies; prominent business leaders and talking-heads from internationally renowned research facilities; stakeholders from global scientific organisations and membership groups; and science media and senior editors from peer-reviewed journals.
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kinderlererProf Julian Kinderlerer
Cape Town University, South Africa
Panellist

Julian Kinderlerer is the immediate past president of the European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies (EGE), reporting to the President of the European Commission, the Council and the Parliament on ethical issues at their request or on the EGE’s own initiative. He is emeritus professor of Intellectual Property Law at the University of Cape Town, is a former professor of Biotechnology and Society at the Delft University of technology in the Netherlands and was the Director of the Sheffield Institute of Biotechnology Law and Ethics within the University of Sheffield, UK. He initially graduated from the University of Cape Town in Chemistry and mathematics before obtaining his PhD in biochemistry from Cambridge. He has acted as the specialist adviser to a House of Lords Committee on regulation of biotechnology, and during 2000 was a Director at UNEP assisting developing countries draft regulatory systems for the release of GM organisms into the environment. He has recently chaired a group advising the SA government on drafting a new law on indigenous knowledge which is being debated in the Parliament having worked with the DST on ethics and synthetic biology, nanotechnology and on a database policy for indigenous knowledge. Amongst other Opinions drafted by the EGE and at the request of the then President of the European Commission the EGE produced two substantive opinions on the ethics of information and communication technologies and on the ethics of surveillance and security systems during its last mandate. Julian has also been involved in producing opinions on ethics of modern developments in agricultural technologies and in the producing an ethical framework for assessing research, production and use of energy.
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gloverDame Anne Glover
University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Panellist

Anne has a BSc in Biochemistry from Edinburgh and a PhD in Molecular Microbiology from Cambridge, UK. She has pursued a career in scientific research at Aberdeen University and her research has been varied including studying how proteins are directed to the correct location within our cells, the diversity and function of the microbial population in soil, the development of biological sensors (biosensors) to detect environmental pollution and more recently, how we respond to stress at the molecular level. This current area of research has particular relevance to how we age (our cells are under stress in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease) and also how we respond to artificial stresses such as chemotherapy. She has also commercialised some of her biosensor technology into a successful company which diagnoses environmental pollution and provides solutions for its clean-up.In 2008 she was made a Woman of Outstanding Achievement in Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) and has worked hard to raise the profile of women in SET and to ensure that not only are women are recruited into careers in SET but that they are supported to remain in the profession during their careers. Anne has promoted the communication of science and has appeared on BBC and international television and many global radio programmes. In 2009, she was awarded a CBE by the Queen in recognition of her services to environmental sciences. Anne was the first Chief Scientific Adviser to the President of the European Commission (2012-2015). Prior to that, she was the first Chief Scientific Adviser for Scotland (2006-2011). In both positions Anne transformed the way science, engineering and technology were used and discussed within government and developed strategic initiatives to bridge the gap between science and policy. She has also been a very effective and well respected ambassador for European science. She is currently Vice Principal for External Affairs and Dean for Europe at the University of Aberdeen. Amongst other external activities, she Chairs the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland and is a Trustee of the African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF) and Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI). Professor Glover became a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) for services to Science in the UK and Europe in the 2015 Queen’s Birthday Honours List and was elected to the Royal Society in April 2016.
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arimotoProf Tateo Arimoto
Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan
Panellist

Tateo Arimoto is Professor and Director, Science, Technology and Innovation Policy Program at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS) and also Principal Fellow, Center for Research and Development Strategy (CRDS) at Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). He previously served as Director General of Science & Technology Policy Bureau of the Ministry of Education and Science, Government of Japan. He also held the position of Executive Research Fellow at the Economic and Social Research Institute of the Cabinet office. He has played an active role in public policy making and implementation in the area of science, technology and innovation in Japan. In his current roles, Mr. Arimoto is a major promoter of science of science and innovation policy in Japan and is overseeing ambitious efforts to foster innovation to address socio-economic challenges with multidisciplinary approach. He has been a co-chair person of the OECD study project on scientific advice. He has published several books and numerous papers in quality journals and given many invited lectures/seminars on science, technology and innovation in national and international conferences such as OECD, APEC, EU, ESOF, WSF, STS Forum and AAAS; “Science and Technology Policy” (by T. Arimoto, in Have Japanese Firms Changed”, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), “Rebuilding Public Trust in Science for Policy Making” (by T. Arimoto and Y. Sato, Science, vol.337, pp1176-1177, 2012), “Crisis, renewal and the prospects for science advice in Japan”(by T. Arimoto and Y. Sato, The Guardian, 28 August 2014), “Building the Foundations for Scientific Advice in the International Context”(by Y. Sato, H.Koi, and T.Arimoto, Science and Diplomacy, vol.3 No.3, September 2014), “UNESCO Science Report – Towards 2030”, Japan Chapter (by Y. Sato, and T.Arimoto, November 2015). “ Five years after Fukushima: scientific advice in Japan”, by Y. Sato and T.Arimoto, Palgrave Communications, 7 June 2016. “Scientific Advice-STI Policy Making in the 21st Century”,by T.Arimoto et al. University of Tokyo Press, 2016,in Japanese (English summary available).
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patelMr Imraan Patel
Department of Science and Technology, South Africa
Panellist

A public policy and strategy manager with a focus on innovation, inclusive development, sustainability, social and economic development, and public management and governance. Employed since 2006 at the Department of Science and Technology, he is currently a Deputy Director-General and represents the department on the social and economic clusters of government and the advisory committee for the Green Fund. He is also a member of the board of MINTEK, the Water Research Commission, Trade and Industrial Policy Strategies (TIPS) and an alternative South African board representative to the Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management (SASSCAL). Prior to joining the DST, he worked for four years at the Centre for Public Service Innovation, an agency of government supporting innovation in the delivery of public services. He also worked at the Department of Public Service and Administration for four years. He began his working life with a five-year stint at the Workplace Information Group (WIG), a non-governmental organisation providing health and safety support to trade union followed by a three-year employment in the formative years of the National Labour and Economic Development Institute (NALEDI), a think tank to the largest trade union federation in South Africa. At the DST, he is responsible for strategically driving a portfolio of investments and policies that advances the social and economic development priorities of government through science and technology-based interventions. Areas of focus include Information and Communications Technologies, Sector Development, Climate Change and Biodiversity, Environmental Goods and Services with a focus on water and waste, Advanced Manufacturing, Mining and Minerals Beneficiation, Chemicals, Technology Localisation, Innovation for Inclusive Development, and indicators and measurement of systems of innovation.
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britoDr Lidia Brito
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Mozambique
Panellist

Lidia Brito, a forest engineer, with a Master and Doctorate in Forest and Wood Science from Colorado State University in the USA, was born in Mozambique, and have been part of Eduardo Mondlane University staff since her graduation in Forest Engineering in 1981.She has held senior positions in Mozambique such as Head of the Forestry Department from the Faculty of Agronomy, Vice-Rector for Academic Affairs of Eduardo Mondlane University, Minister for Higher Education, Science and Technology, and Advisor for Strategic Planning and External Relations of the Mayor of Maputo City. Lidia joined UNESCO in November 2009 as Director for Science policy and Sustainable Development at the Natural Science Sector, in Paris, and currently she is the UNESCO Regional Director for Science in the Latin-America and Caribbean region. Her areas of expertise range from forestry and sustainable management of Natural Resources to Higher Education, Science and Technology policies and programmes as part of public policies for sustainable development. She has chaired several commissions and task teams in particular in Higher Education, and STI for Sustainable Development. She co-chaired the Scientific Organizing Committee for Planet Under Pressure Conference in London, a major conference for the preparation of Rio+20, and she is a member of several international Boards such as African Foresters Forum Governing Board, CHET Board, Stockholm Environmental Institute Governing Board, Bioversity Governing Board among others. Lidia, spearheaded the 1st Open Science Forum for Latin America and the Caribbean (CILAC 2016) which took place from the 6th – 9th September 2016 in Montevideo, Uruguay.
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